All of us Vs Keratoconus

Members Login
Chatbox
Please log in to join the chat!
Post Info TOPIC: Keratoconus in pilots!


Newbie

Status: Offline
Posts: 1
Date: Tue Oct 14 12:26 PM, 2014
Keratoconus in pilots!
Permalink   
 


 

Hi all,

I have recently had an eye exam, it turned out that I have Keratoconus in both eyes, one is mild, the other is moderate to advanced.

I have problems in my vision at night only, where lights seem as diagonal lines. In daylight, I do not have any problem, everything seems perfect.

The problem is that I always wanted to become a pilot, the National carrier of my country is very strict in terms of vision correction unlike other airlines/authorities who allow you to fly should you see well up top 20/20 even though with glasses/contacts on.

I have seen 2 doctors, both advised cross-linking to stop the progression of the disease as soon as possible.

One doctor told me that after Cross-linking, a PRK laser would be a good option to regain vision back to 20/20, the other one said he does not recommend PRK to me as it does not suit my case, instead suggested corneal rings or RGP lenses. 

What do you think I should proceed with?  Can a doctor know that I have gone a PRK laser surgery if I do not tell them during my pilot selection? 

Any help is highly appreciated! 



__________________
Deb


Veteran Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 97
Date: Wed Oct 15 4:44 PM, 2014
Permalink   
 

Think on the lines of, the least invasive option that gives you the chance for more/further options as well.

This could be to try intacs first and then PRK to fine tune the vision further.

Still there may be night time disturbances, be it smaller than now.

There is a thread from a pilot here on his experience with limited topo PRK http://www.kcfreedom.org/t35046757/airline-pilots-prk-and-crosslinking-experience/



__________________
GRS


Optometrist

Status: Offline
Posts: 31
Date: Mon Nov 3 4:00 AM, 2014
Permalink   
 

The problem is that even if you have 20/20 vision, you can still suffer from horrific glare at night.  The best option would be wavefront-guided scleral lenses.  We provide them at www.laserfitlens.com .  I see some of our patients have already posted about their experiences.  The entire purpose of the wavefront optics is to eliminate or reduce the unwanted visual noise.  We've been doing this for many years.



__________________

Dr. G.

www.laserfitlens.com

Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us

www.kcfreedom.org

Knowledge Works